Man Jailed After Convicted of Animal Cruelty

Eric Buckley was also banned at Pontypridd Magistrates’ Court from keeping animals for life.

Last month he and his wife Doreen were convicted of animal cruelty, including keeping a pony and goats in their cellar, and breaching previous bans.

The couple, who were living in a former pub in Gilfach Goch, had 24 animals in their cellar, the court was told.

The court heard it was a case of prolonged neglect and the animals had been confiscated.

An arrest warrant had been issued for Buckley earlier on Friday after he initially failed to appear for sentencing.

The pony found in the cellar
The pony found in the Buckleys’ cellar

His 46-year-old wife had been taken to hospital suffering from chest pains. Her sentencing was adjourned for a week.

They had admitted five charges of causing unnecessary suffering and two for breaching banning orders.

RSPCA inspectors told last month’s hearing at Pontypridd Magistrates’ Court that conditions were some of the worst they had ever seen.

They had already been banned from keeping dogs for 10 years due to animal welfare breaches in 1993.

After more serious breaches in 1995 both were banned from keeping all animals for life.

Monique McKevitt, for Buckley, told the court on Friday the couple had been on the way to court when Mrs Buckley suffered either an angina or a heart attack.

She said she talked to Buckley on the phone that morning while he was outside a hospital accident and emergency unit.

“She was taken in an ambulance this morning to the Royal Gwent Hospital (Newport),” she told the court.

“It is a possible heart attack, a potentially life-threatening condition, and he is extremely worried about her.”

One of the 11 Grey Hounds Found in Unlit Cellar

Several animals were rescued from Eric Buckley’s home in a poor state

But District judge Jill Watkins said: “Apart from the obvious bond between husband and wife, there is no real reason why he should not answer bail.”

The couple previously appeared before magistrates in Kingston upon Thames, where they were living at the time.

RSPCA inspector Nicola Johnston said it was “beyond anything” she had seen before, after finding nine geese, two goats, a pony, as well as 11 dogs and a cat at the property in June 2010.

The charges the couple faced related in particular to four dogs which were found to be suffering flea infestations, ear infections and oral disease.

At one point up to 13 retired racing greyhounds had the run of the property, which they used as a toilet.

Most though were kept in an unlit cellar, which was almost an inch deep in animal waste.

Ms Johnston said when Eric Buckley was approached about the conditions and asked why he kept so many animals, he answered: “Why not?”

Published on the BBC News Website: 17 June 2011, Last updated at 16:16 GMT

For the full story from the BBC News Website click on the following link: http://tinyurl.com/5s8rmjh

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Pony, Geese, 2 Goats, 13 Dogs in Cellar

This is the pony found in the cellarA couple already banned from keeping animals for life were found in a RSPCA raid to have a pony, geese and goats in a “stinking” cellar at their home. Eric and Doreen Buckley had nine geese, two goats, a pony, as well as 11 dogs and a cat in a converted Rhondda pub, Pontypridd magistrates heard.

Both were bailed after admitting five charges of causing unecessary suffering and two for breaching banning orders.

RSPCA Logo

A RSPCA inspector said it was “beyond anything” she had seen before.

RSPCA

The Buckleys were warned they could be jailed.

The court heard how police and the RSPCA raided the Buckley’s “stinking” home in June 2010 only to find they had left over night.

The property, in High Street, Gilfach Goch, was in such a putrid condition, it was regarded as proof of breaching animal welfare rules alone.

At one point up to 13 retired racing greyhounds had the run of the property, which they used as a toilet.

Most though were kept in an unlit cellar, which was almost an inch deep in animal waste.

“I have never seen anything like it before in my life,”
said RSPCA inspector Nicola Johnston.

“Even before going inside the house you could sniff the air outside and realise something was wrong.”

“Inside, it was beyond anything I have ever seen, or hope ever to see again.”


‘Squishing and squashing’

Ms Johnston described how she found worse conditions inside the unlit cellar.

“You stood there in complete blackness squishing and squashing underfoot as you walked,” she added. The air was stagnant and stinking.

Dog
This is one of the thirteen dogs in the unlit cellar.

There was particular worry about the 13 dogs condition.

“To think that somebody thought it was a fit place to keep animals was incredible.”

Ms Johnston said three dogs in particular had to receive comprehensive dental surgery as a result of their condition.

“The vet actually said in the case of one dog that it had the worst dental condition he had ever seen in his career,” she added. “He was horrified.”

“It was so bad when the dog’s mouth opened the teeth moved about individually. To keep animals like that is completely unnecessary.”

She said that when Eric Buckley was approached about the conditions and asked why he kept so many animals, he answered: “Why not?”

Buckley, 56, admitted all the charges against him on Friday on the eve of a trial.

House
The conditions at the house appalled RSPCA inspectors

His wife, 46, failed to attend but had previously made full admissions to all charges through her lawyer.

The charges they faced related in particular to four dogs which were found to be suffering flea infestations, ear infections and oral disease.

“This is a serious case aggravated by the fact that there was an order from a magistrates’ court which you breached and which led to the suffering of these animals,” said district judge Jill Watkins.

They were warned they could face a custodial sentence, with the case adjourned until 17 June.

The couple had already been banned from keeping dogs for 10 years due to animal welfare breaches in 1993.

After more series breaches in 1995 both were banned from keeping all animals for life.

The couple appeared before magistrates in Kingston upon Thames, where they were living at the time, on both occasions.

Geese

Some of the geese rescued by the RSPCA

Published on the BBC News Website on the, 27 May 2011. Last updated at 13:40 GMT

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-south-west-wales-13571423

24 Animals Pony, Geese, Goats, Dogs Found in Cellar

Doreen Buckley’s suspended sentence for animal cruelty

The pony found in the cellar

This was the Pony found in the Buckleys' cellar

A woman who was convicted of animal cruelty has been given a suspended prison sentence a week after her husband was jailed

A court previously heard that Doreen and Eric Buckley, of Pontypridd, Wales, UK had 24 animals in their cellar at a former pub in Gilfach Goch, Wales.

But Buckley was absent from Pontypridd Magistrates’ Court last week when her husband was jailed for 12 weeks.

On Friday, she was given the same sentence, but suspended for 12 months.

The court last month heard that the couple had two dozen animals including a pony, geese and goats, in their basement, and had breached previous bans.

District Judge Jill Watkins was told at Friday’s hearing that the Buckleys had continued to keep animals at home.

An RSPCA inspector had been denied entry to the property last Saturday where, the court heard, they were now keeping four dogs, some fish and two ferrets.

Doreen Buckley admitted that reptiles were also in residence.

She had failed to attend court for sentence last week after the court was told she had suffered a suspected heart attack.

Ms Watkins ordered Eric Buckley to attend alone and jailed him when he showed up.

Heart palpitationsShe extended his wife’s bail by a week but asked for proof that her condition was legitimate.

Neil Foley, Doreen Buckley’s solicitor, told the court the hospital which had last week treated her refused to provide proof she had been there.

But he assured the judge that she suffered from both pleurisy and heart palpitations.

Ms Watkins jailed Buckley for 12 weeks, as she had done to her husband the week before, but it was suspended for 12 months.

Doreen Buckley, who was also ordered to wear an electric tag, agreed to sign over all the animals the couple owned to the RSPCA.

A life ban on keeping animals was also reimposed with more stringent conditions than previously.

The couple had been banned for life from keeping animals by magistrates in Kingston upon Thames where they were living in 1995.

This article first published on the BBC Website, 24 June 2011, Last updated at 16:42 GMT

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How to Recognise Cruelty

The ASPCA

Signs That an Animal Might Be Abused

Recognising cruelty is simple, right? Not quite, say ASPCA experts. Aggressive, timid or fearful behavior doesn’t always tell the whole story. Animals may appear to be timid or frightened for many reasons other than abuse.

“It’s almost impossible to make conclusions based on a pet’s behavior alone,” says the ASPCA Animal Behavior Center’s Kristen Collins, CPDT. “The best way to tell whether a pet is being or has been abused is to examine him and his surrounding environment.” Check out our list of signs that may alert you an animal needs help:

Physical Signs

Collar so tight that it has caused a neck wound or has become embedded in the pet’s neck. Open wounds, signs of multiple healed wounds or an ongoing injury or illness that isn’t being treated. Untreated skin conditions that have caused loss of hair, scaly skin, bumps or rashes. Extreme thinness or emaciation—bones may be visible. Fur infested with fleas, ticks or other parasites. Patches of bumpy, scaly skin rashes. Signs of inadequate grooming, such as extreme matting of fur, overgrown nails and dirty coat. Weakness, limping or the inability to stand or walk normally. Heavy discharge from eyes or nose. An owner striking or otherwise physically abusing an animal. Visible signs of confusion or extreme drowsiness.

Environmental Signs

Pets are tied up alone outside for long periods of time without adequate food or water, or with food or water that is unsanitary. Pets are kept outside in inclement weather without access to adequate shelter. Pets are kept in an area littered with feces, garbage, broken glass or other objects that could harm them. Animals are housed in kennels or cages (very often crowded in with other animals) that are too small to allow them to stand, turn around and make normal movements possibly with too many other animals.

“Reporting suspected animal cruelty ensures that animals in jeopardy receive prompt and often lifesaving care,” says ASPCA Special Agent Joann Sandano. “By making a complaint to the police or humane society in your area—you can even do so anonymously—you help ensure that animals in need are rescued and that perpetrators of animal cruelty are brought to justice.”

If you see signs of animal abuse, don’t keep it to yourself. Here’s how to report cruelty in your area.

Act Now—Report Animal Cruelty!

Animal cruelty is not only wrong—it is against the law! Abuse of any kind should be reported to the appropriate authorities immediately.

Where do I Report Animal Cruelty?

In NYC: Cruelty situations involving animals in New York City should be reported to the ASPCA’s Humane Law Enforcement department at (212) 876-7700, ext. 4450, or humanel@aspca.org.

IN NJ: If you believe you have witnessed animal cruelty in the state of New Jersey and would like to report it, please call the NJSPCA at (800) 582-5979 or fill out NJSPCA’s online form.

Outside NYC: You will need to find out the name of the persons in your area who are responsible for investigating and enforcing the anti-cruelty codes in your town, county and/or state. These people typically work for your local humane organization, animal control agency, taxpayer-funded animal shelter or police precinct.

If you run into trouble finding the correct agency to contact, you should call or visit your local police department and ask for their help in enforcing the law. If your local police department is unable to assist, you can ask at your local shelter or animal control agency for advice on who to contact to report animal cruelty in your community. To find contact information for your local shelter, check the yellow pages or visit the ASPCA’s searchable database of nearly 5,000 community SPCAs, humane societies and animal control organisations.

Tips for Reporting Animal Cruelty

Once you have found out which law enforcement agent you should speak to, it’s important to provide him or her with a concise, written, factual statement of what you observed, giving dates and approximate times whenever possible. If at all feasible, try to photograph the abusive situation and date your pictures. It would also be helpful to get short, factual written statements from other witnesses.

When you call to report animal cruelty, always make sure to keep a careful record of exactly whom you contact, the date of the contacts and the content and outcome of your discussion. Never give away a document without making a copy for your file! Make it clear to the agent that you are very interested in pursuing the case, and that you are willing to lend whatever assistance you can.

Follow Up if Necessary

If you don’t receive a response from the officer assigned to your case within a reasonable length of time, don’t be afraid to present your information to his or her supervisor and, if necessary, to local government officials, such as the county commissioner, and ask them to act.

If you have witnessed the cruel act yourself, you can go to your local police commissioner and ask to swear out a warrant to summon the accused person to court. Remember that expert witnesses are sometimes necessary in animal cruelty cases. A veterinarian, for example, can sign a statement that it is his or her “expert opinion” that a dog suffers when hit with a chain, is deprived of food, etc. Expert opinions will very often make or break a case, so if you happen to know a sympathetic veterinarian, you may wish to seek his or her assistance and tell the officer that you have expert support lined up for your case.

Animal Cruelty on TV and Film

The ASPCA shares your concern about the media’s depiction of violence and cruelty towards animals for entertainment purposes. Please know, however, that many of these instances are constitutionally protected free speech—and may not even involve a real animal.

If you are offended by something you viewed, we suggest that you contact the network that aired the program or the publisher of the film in question.

You may also wish to contact the American Humane Association Movie and Television Unit online or at (818) 501-0123. This unit oversees the use of live animals in movies and television as part of an agreement with the Screen Directors Guild.

Websites that Depict Animal Cruelty

The Internet delivers an astounding array of images and ideas into homes across the world. But not all of these images are particularly animal-friendly. In fact, some of what is being sold and shown online crosses into the realm of criminal activity. And in some cases, there are laws against showing and selling these images.

To report websites that display acts of cruelty to animals, please contact the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Department of Justice.

Questions or concerns about calling in a cruelty complaint? Take a look at our Reporting Cruelty FAQ.
http://www.aspca.org/fight-animal-cruelty/reporting-cruelty-faq.aspx

“Without phone calls from the concerned citizens who report cruelty in their neighborhoods, we wouldn’t know about most instances of animal abuse,” says ASPCA Supervisory Special Investigator Annemarie Lucas, whom you may have seen in action on Animal Planet’s Animal Precinct.
Do you know where and how to report cruelty in your town? Our FAQ provides information on recognizing and reporting animal cruelty, as well as cruelty laws and how to talk to children about this important issue.

About the ASPCA

Who They Are

The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) was the first humane society to be established in North America and is, today, one of the largest in the world. Our organization was founded by Henry Bergh in 1866 on the belief that animals are entitled to kind and respectful treatment at the hands of humans, and must be protected under the law. Headquartered in New York City, the ASPCA maintains a strong local presence, and with programs that extend our anti-cruelty mission across the country, we are recognized as a national animal welfare organization. We are a privately funded 501(c)(3) not-for-profit corporation, and proud to boast more than 1 million supporters across the country.

What They Do

As the first humane organization to be granted legal authority to investigate and make arrests for crimes against animals, we are wholly dedicated to fulfilling the ASPCA mission through nonviolent approaches. Our organization provides local and national leadership in three key areas: caring for pet parents and pets, providing positive outcomes for at-risk animals and serving victims of animal cruelty. For more on our work in each of these areas, pleas visit our programs and services page.

For more information on American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) click on this link www.aspca.com

PUP AID

PUP AID is very keen to support and highlight both local and national dog rescue charities as these provide a healthy alternative to buying a puppy farmed pup.

Rescue dogs are usually already house-trained, have reached their full adult size and have even been temperament tested and totally ready for their forever home. Choosing to adopt a rescue dog can potentially mean one less poorly pup is needed to supply a pet shop or puppy dealer; in other words, adopting a rescue dog reduces the demand for farmed pups and helps to end puppy farming. Please always consider rescue when choosing a dog.

The links below will open a second window if you want to learn more information from Wikipedia about Dogs, Rescued Dogs, Pet Adoption and Puppy Farming:

Dogs
Rescue Dogs
Pet Adoption
Puppy Farming

The following link will open the official Pup Aid Website: http://www.pupaid.org/